Codeine or Movement? Which Will You Choose?

There are patients whose conditions have progressed in ways many of us cannot imagine, despite their best efforts and the efforts of their medical teams. One such patient is Sam Moss. In 2010 Sam was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, but that was just the start of her medical journey: she has since been diagnosed with other conditions.

12 months after my leg broke, my right femur was also showing signs of disease on MRI with bone marrow involvement so a rod had to be placed in that to prevent an imminent break and repeat medical emergency like we had with my femur break in 2014. I am constantly dealing with multiple foot fractures and none of my broken bones in my legs or feet will heal.

Source: My Medical Musings

Sam now runs a support group for those facing medical challenges, Medical Musings With Friends. It is a closed group, very supportive. If you would like to join, click the link. Membership of the group is also a rapid introduction to how severely some conditions can progress, even with the best medical care and patient tenacity in the world.

My objective, for myself and my clients, is to slow condition progression and manage pain where possible. Yes, sometimes our medical conditions do take control as described above, but many of us, in collaboration with our medical teams, can control our conditions, be the master of our medical destiny. We, as patients, want to ensure we don’t give those medical conditions any head start if we can help it. If, like me, you are lucky enough to have a choice, don’t waste that opportunity – there are many out there who would be very grateful to be in our situation. Chronic condition severity is a spectrum and we are all somewhere along that spectrum trying to do the best we can.

I support the recent rescheduling of codeine. I definitely think the change over could have been better planned, as it seems many where left without codeine OR any alternative. Those who ensured they had prescriptions found there was no stock available in pharmacies.

In the past I have used Panadeine Forte after having teeth extracted. I’ve used Tramadol (another opioid) about three times a year. I’m not against codeine per se, it has a place in medicine. Taken under medical supervision when appropriate it is a useful drug. Self-medicating with over-the-counter supplies regularly can lead to problems.

There is a reason why morphine and its equivalents feature on the World Health Organization (WHO) list of essential medicines, along with oxygen, steroids and penicillin. These are virtually irreplaceable in certain situations, including severe burns, postoperative recovery, cancer pain and palliative care. But there is no additional benefit of opioids over simple drugs like paracetamol and ibuprofen when taken for toothache, back pain, migraines, asymptomatic kidney stones, muscle sprain, fractures and many other conditions associated with chronic pain. Here, opioids are not just unhelpful but they can also worsen pain, apart from the fact that they are addictive and fatal. Therefore, it’s best to avoid them for all but a narrow range of conditions that you should discuss at length with your doctor.

Source: Ranjana Srivastava, The Guardian

Early in my journey, one of my problems was I was VERY stiff and sore when I got out of bed in the morning. I had two choices, A) try a pain killer of some sort or B) move. Back then I really had no idea what I was doing, I was on a learning curve. I found very quickly if I walked, even as little as a few dozen steps, the pain and stiffness subsided. Clearly, for me at least, moving worked.

Now, some years later and professionally trained, I am much better at linking my discomfort levels to what I have, or have not, been doing. This last week has been a classic. For whatever reason I had several days when by six o’clock at night I was out of energy. I mean totally out of energy. I’d arrive home from work and flop on the couch and be unable to move. Which, for me (and many others) is a very bad plan. The stiffness and pain returns. Just getting up of the couch, I was stiff and had to straighten my back. Not how I like to be. As anyone with chronic conditions knows, sometimes there are no obvious reasons for “flares” they just arrive unannounced. I had my thyroid function and iron levels checked, they were fine. I had again had a change to my routine, which my conditions do not seem to like very much, so that may have been the trigger. While understanding why is helpful to prevent future flares, I haven’t managed to detect a pattern (flares are rare for me), I just needed to get back on the horse.


When I ensure I move enough and keep my strength up I am pain free and have very little, if any, stiffness. A little discomfort every now and then if my lumbar spine reminds me “Hey, I’m here, don’t forget I’m here”. I reassure my facet joints I haven’t forgotten them, do some stretches and core strength work and they settle down.

Best-practice recommendations now are focused on self-management and self-support: moving away from opioids, prescription or otherwise, and focusing more on allied healthcare and other non-drug methods to minimise pain. Pain Australia has launched a campaign called RealRelief to help people move beyond codeine and take control of their pain. Their foundational idea is that most people with chronic pain can improve their lives without opioids or surgery as long as they are appropriately supported to do it.

The caveat there is the support. Hard to move beyond pain when you are by yourself and suffering.

Source: Making codeine prescription-only was right. Where do we go from here? – The Guardian

No, I do not take painkillers in these situations. I have an edge, of course: I did the PACT program. I know and understand the science behind the recommendations. I recognise it can be difficult for someone without that knowledge and support to resist reaching for the pill packet, which MAY give them some relief in about twenty minutes. I can walk 500 steps and be pain free a lot faster than the twenty minutes it takes the pills to work, without the associated health risks of codeine. I also stress the MAY (give relief). Anyone with chronic pain will attest to the fact sometimes the pain meds just do not even touch the sides.

What if I took Option A and reached for the pain killers instead of moving? What would happen? I’d get worse, that is what would happen. That is the cold, hard truth of it.

de-conditioningIf I reached for the painkillers, I’d then have a foggy head, so I’d lie (or maybe sit) down. I’d be doing nothing to actually strengthen or stretch my muscles or counter any of the negative affects shown above. I would progressively deteriorate over time and be on a downward spiral. Then my quality of life would suffer. Josh, another chronic condition patient, has written a very amusing story about having a couple of beers. Now, Josh is one of those patients I referred to in my opening paragraphs, he has done everything possible yet because of his medical situation he is on some pretty strong stuff. I may ultimately end up in a similar situation, but I’m going to do everything in my power to delay such a situation. I also do NOT see getting worse as inevitable for me. I like being able to have a nice wine or two over dinner or with co-workers on a Friday night without sounding smashed (to quote Josh’s wife).

I like driving, dining out, dancing and swimming. I want to keep my body as functional as possible for as long as possible. Don’t you?


Once we start on that downward spiral, we find we have so many restrictions. Such restrictions may include:

  • Limited driving ability (no drugged driving, for example)
  • No alcohol
  • Progressive physical deterioration due to inactivity
  • Loss of social interaction
  • Reduced working hours or incapacity to work
  • Depression and/or anxiety

No, it is NOT easy to start the movement momentum. Sometimes it is not easy to keep it going. Yes, it does require willpower and resilience. Yes, it requires mental strength to take those first steps in the morning or after sitting for too long.

Yes, as a community we need more support. Refer again to the above article: “as long as they are appropriately supported to do it“. I was lucky enough to be accepted into the PACT program but there are not enough of those programs available yet and there are waiting lists.

Think about where you want to be in five years time. Do you want to have a body that can support the quality of life you desire or do you want to be staring down that spiral?

Talk to your doctors, ask them if movement as medicine is an option for you.

“It’s [resilience] vital to the process,” he explains. “I’ve seen patients who, under the circumstances, might want to just give up, but they don’t. In fact, they thrive. Their resilience helps them cope and keep moving forward to find a solution. They say, ‘I’m going to make it no matter what.’”

“We used to put patients on bed rest for pain. Not anymore,” says Dr. Tom. “Staying physically active is critical for pain management, as it releases endorphins which can improve your mood and even ease pain.” People who don’t move can get tight muscles, joint pain, muscle strain and spasms, which can worsen existing pain.

Source: 4 Resilient Ways To Cope With Chronic Pain

If you’d like to give moving a try, click on Contact and send me an email.

Competition: Free Training to LIMBER UP!


To welcome in this brand New Year and celebrate whipping my thyroid into submission with some radioactive iodineI have an offer for readers! I am now ready and able to re-launch my Limberation activities: giving a lucky winner eight weeks free training seems a good way to start the year. As of this week, my thyroid function is rated as normal: I am definitely feeling the almost three month enforced hiatus was worth it!

Would you like to Limber Up to Live Life? To Move More? To start using Movement As Medicine? Reduce/manage pain? I’ve done it, so can you. 

There are rules! There are always rules! This might seem like a lot of rules for a competition, but we are talking about your health here, so precautions are appropriate!

Rules and entrant criteria

  • Have a medically diagnosed condition that will benefit from exercise (that is most of them – check with your doctor if in doubt). Please provide brief details of your condition/(s) with your entry.
  • Be taking any medications prescribed for your condition as scheduled (i.e. not skipping doses).
  • Have or be willing to obtain a medical clearance to exercise. This should include any restrictions recommended by your medical team (e.g. at one point I was not allowed to do shoulder presses).
  • Be committed to undertaking a personalised program for eight weeks. This will involve eight personal one hour consultation sessions over a two month period and completion of unsupervised exercises as prescribed on other days of the week (frequency to be determined at initial consultation).
  • Live within a 40 kilometre radius of postcode 3181 OR be prepared/able to meet within a 40 kilometre radius.
  • Be available Saturday through to Tuesday, one day per week for eight weeks.
  • Give permission to be interviewed for this website and have photos published.
  • Undergo standard fitness industry pre-exercise screening.
  • Complete initial consultation questionnaires and agreement to undertake exercise as applicable.
  • In 30 words or less tell me why you want to undertake exercise.
  • Entries close Saturday, February 10, 2018.
  • The winner will be announced February 24, 2018. The winner will be contacted personally and announced on this website. The prize is non-transferable.
  • Submit your entry via email to including your name, address and contact phone number. The subject line should be Limber Up.
  • The winner’s initial consultation will take place between February 24, 2018 and March 10, 2018 but can be subject to negotiation, within reason, if required.

If this page is your first visit to this website, please read my About page to understand why I offer a different training experience. I’m in the same boat as you: multiple chronic conditions, was losing quality of life, wanted to stay off pain medications.

Your contact details will not be used for any purposes other than your competition entry. All contact details of entrants other than the winner will be destroyed after the winner accepts the offer (unless the entrant indicates otherwise). If the winner is unable to accept the offer for any reason, the runner-up will be made the offer.

The winner will be chosen by me based on suitability for an exercise program and the authenticity of the 30 word outline specified above. I reserve the right to contact entrants if I determine clarification of entry details is required prior to determining the winner. This is for your protection.

Take that first step to a better quality of life today.

Make 2018 YOUR Year for SMART Goals

Seasons Greetings to all! Christmas is 30 or so hours away as I write (for those of us in the southern hemisphere). As the sun sets on 2017, we have an opportunity to re-evaluate our health progress and polish up our plans to get stronger, more active, more mobile and have less pain, less lethargy, better sleep: culminating in a better quality of life in 2018.

If you are still in “I’m thinking about it” mode, take stock over Christmas. What invitations did you turn down because you didn’t feel you could summon the energy required? Would you like to accept those invitations next year? Were you able to do the shopping you wanted to do without crashing in a heap for two days afterwards? Make 2018 the year you make the choice to include moving more into your treatment plans.

Talk to your doctors, get a clear understanding of what benefits you may expect from moving more.


Now that my recent treatment change is behind me, I’m making more ambitious plans for myself and setting new goals for the new year. SMART goals. SMART goals are used in many walks of life: I’ve seen various wordings used depending on the context. For our purposes, I like the following definitions.

S = Specific. The goal needs to be something specific, not a nebulous idea.

M = Measurable. If we can’t measure our achievements against the goal, we won’t know if we are getting anywhere.

A = Achievable. It has to be achievable. If I set myself a goal of climbing Mt Everest, while both specific and measurable, for me it is not achievable. Swimming a two kilometre session – THAT is achievable.

R = Relevant. You will see realistic often used in this spot, but for our purposes I prefer relevant. We have limitations on our energy, our strength and our time. There is no point in setting goals that are not relevant to what we wish to achieve, which is better quality of life.

T = Timeboxed. There needs to be a time period within which you will achieve this goal. This helps to hold you to account and stay on target.

Let’s give it a try. “My goal is to swim two kilometres.” Is this a SMART goal?

No, it isn’t. While it is specific, measurable, relevant and (I hope) achievable, I have set no time target. “I want to walk more”, while relevant and achievable, is not a measurable goal – “more” could be anything. Walk longer distances or walk more often? Nor is it timeboxed. Walk more by when? 

Let’s have another go at this. “My goal is to swim a two kilometre session by 30 June 2018”. Now I have a SMART goal. I will need a progress plan to reach that goal, so I will need shorter term goals to get there: “My goal is to swim 1.2 kilometres once a week by 28 February 2018”.

That is one of my goals. Yours may well be something along the lines of “I will do my stretches every day for the month of January.” This is specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, timeboxed AND will set you up for the next step in establishing a movement as medicine strategy.

A walking more SMART goal could be very simple. “I will walk for three minutes, five times a day for one week”. At the end of the week a new SMART goal can be set. Remember when setting goals to pace yourself, always pace yourself.


For context, I was on crutches for much of 2014. I was diagnosed at the end of 2014. You can read how I started back to moving more on How tough is it to get moving?. My major goals for 2018 are:

  • Swim a two kilometre session by 30 June 2018.
  • Increase my daily step count to 10,000 steps a day by 30 September 2018.
  • Increase my leg press to 160 kilograms by 30 June 2018. (I was at 140 kg before my treatment change – I have to work back up after dropping back).

As I achieve those, I will set new goals during the year.

Of course, I have one other goal: help others get moving! I am back to normal availability after my recent hiatus, so reach out. It costs nothing to investigate the possibility.

Have a great time over the break! Stay safe!


When Treatment Throws Rocks on the Road

Maintaining our upward trajectory in managing our conditions can run into obstacles every now and then, one of those rocks in the road can be a change of treatment. We need to ensure we don’t let our progress to date slide away while at the same time ensuring we give ourselves physical and emotional space to deal with the bumps in the road.

What I have learnt from my own recent experience of changing treatment, is this.

Triple Check Any Timing Advice

You may get different advice from different practitioners involved in the treatment, if there is more than one practitioner (as is so often the case). If you have to make plans, such as time off work or someone else to care for your children, triple check! My example is I was originally told I would need to be isolated for ten days. I made plans around that advice, such as leave from work. A week before the treatment, I discovered it was five days for work, fourteen days for family/friends over five years of age who were not pregnant, and twenty-eight days for under-fives and pregnant women (which of course can affect working arrangements depending on your job). My isolation specifications are all around time and proximity: preferably not closer than two metres for more than 15 minutes a day.

The point is, when we plan for child care or time off work well in advance, we need to be confident we are planning correctly. I haven’t got to the root cause of why the patient gets different advice from different parties, just warning it is possible, so watch out for it!

Ask About Your Specific Activities

While there were pages of frequently asked questions provided, not one of them addressed swimming or going to the gym! In my case I was allowed to swim on Day 3 and go to the gym on Day 5, provided I took my own towel and kept two metres away from children. I needed to specifically ask about exercise related activities though – something I think is an improvement that could be made in the documentation!

The medical profession are certainly quick to tell us exercise is important medicine (obviously I agree) but then leave all mention of exercise activities out of the FAQs.

Make Sure You Are Advised Of Any Possible Health Effects

Perhaps due to my own naivety I expected my change of treatment to be relatively smooth. In reality, it really has been smooth, I certainly can’t complain too much! Let’s say the effects can be disruptive to your normal routines. I had a period of feeling, as an English friend says, “rough”. Rather a good description, really, rough!  While every situation is different because there are a myriad treatments out there for a myriad of conditions, I found I had an increase in nausea/lightheadedness attacks (which are quite debilitating) and I started to feel RA pain in my hands – this I believe due to the fact my thyroid was having a field day running wild while waiting for the radioactive iodine to work its magic. A thyroid on a binge can exacerbate RA symptoms. Lethargy/fatigue reared its ugly head as well for a few days.

This is being resolved by my going back on my old thyroid medication at a half dose – not an unusual recommendation in my situation, but every case is different. This is an EXAMPLE only!

A stroke survivor friend of mine recently ended up in hospital as his body adjusts to a change in medication. Very different medical cases, he and I, but similar results in that a change of treatment lead to a changed health experience, albeit temporary.

Make sure you are aware of what you might expect and the steps to take to mitigate any unpleasant effects. I knew I could call my endocrinologist for directions, I knew what to watch out for and my GP is watching over me.

Keep Moving As Much As You Can

I will be the first to admit when the nausea/lightheadedness kicks in, there is not much moving of any sort to be done. I am still constantly surprised at how debilitating it is: there is NOTHING I can do when it hits. Apart from take anti-nausea medication. Other patients I have spoken to say similar. No pain, just the awful, all-consuming feeling of utter “OMG, I have to lay down”.

In my case, the overactive thyroid, probably in conjunction with the low iron (lots of chicken and egg stuff here, I have to say) definitely affected my muscle strength/tone. I was very keen to get back in the gym as soon as possible as I know my conditions result in the loss of previous strength gains very quickly.  I’ve worked very hard to be able to do what I do now, I don’t want a ” one step forward, five steps back” situation! I actually haven’t made it to the gym since the treatment change. I was heading to the gym yesterday, but I got waylaid buying a dress – not the advice I would give my clients, but I’m excusing myself on the basis I did walk 8,295 steps in the process of said retail therapy! So back into it today!

I have been swimming, although that was before I started back on the medications and I could only manage 500 or 600 metres before I felt completely wiped out. The point is – do as much as you can, while at the same time being cognisant of the fact your body is going through an internal adjustment. Making the judgement of how much is not enough or too much is a skill that needs to be developed – if this is a first time experience for you, you may need some professional help in making the right choices. Listening to your body and common sense are pretty good decision making aids. Just don’t fall into the trap of using any side-effects of the treatment change as an escape clause, because you will likely regret it later.

I did definitely find I was getting stiffer over the worst few days – reminded me very clearly of WHY I started all this exercise stuff in the first place! I don’t like that stiffness one little bit. Very glad to be getting back to my definition of normal now!


A change of treatment is often recommended for a variety of reasons. I had a change of RA medication in 2016 with no rocks on the road. This time has been a bit different. I am sure over the coming years I may have other treatment adjustments or changes.

Each change may or may not bring temporary changes to our experience. Our goal during these times is to minimise any reversal of our quality of life gains to date.

As mentioned above I felt stiffness starting to return over a few days of relative inactivity. I was stiff getting out of bed, stiff getting off chairs and was finding getting out of my car a bit of a challenge. THAT, if nothing else, is enough of a trigger for me to GET MOVING! The last thing I want is to be unable to get in and out of my car!

Be prepared, plan well, use the medical support available and most of all KEEP MOVING!

Good luck!