Make 2018 YOUR Year for SMART Goals

Seasons Greetings to all! Christmas is 30 or so hours away as I write (for those of us in the southern hemisphere). As the sun sets on 2017, we have an opportunity to re-evaluate our health progress and polish up our plans to get stronger, more active, more mobile and have less pain, less lethargy, better sleep: culminating in a better quality of life in 2018.

If you are still in “I’m thinking about it” mode, take stock over Christmas. What invitations did you turn down because you didn’t feel you could summon the energy required? Would you like to accept those invitations next year? Were you able to do the shopping you wanted to do without crashing in a heap for two days afterwards? Make 2018 the year you make the choice to include moving more into your treatment plans.

Talk to your doctors, get a clear understanding of what benefits you may expect from moving more.

SMART Goals

Now that my recent treatment change is behind me, I’m making more ambitious plans for myself and setting new goals for the new year. SMART goals. SMART goals are used in many walks of life: I’ve seen various wordings used depending on the context. For our purposes, I like the following definitions.

S = Specific. The goal needs to be something specific, not a nebulous idea.

M = Measurable. If we can’t measure our achievements against the goal, we won’t know if we are getting anywhere.

A = Achievable. It has to be achievable. If I set myself a goal of climbing Mt Everest, while both specific and measurable, for me it is not achievable. Swimming a two kilometre session – THAT is achievable.

R = Relevant. You will see realistic often used in this spot, but for our purposes I prefer relevant. We have limitations on our energy, our strength and our time. There is no point in setting goals that are not relevant to what we wish to achieve, which is better quality of life.

T = Timeboxed. There needs to be a time period within which you will achieve this goal. This helps to hold you to account and stay on target.

Let’s give it a try. “My goal is to swim two kilometres.” Is this a SMART goal?

No, it isn’t. While it is specific, measurable, relevant and (I hope) achievable, I have set no time target. “I want to walk more”, while relevant and achievable, is not a measurable goal – “more” could be anything. Walk longer distances or walk more often? Nor is it timeboxed. Walk more by when? 

Let’s have another go at this. “My goal is to swim a two kilometre session by 30 June 2018”. Now I have a SMART goal. I will need a progress plan to reach that goal, so I will need shorter term goals to get there: “My goal is to swim 1.2 kilometres once a week by 28 February 2018”.

That is one of my goals. Yours may well be something along the lines of “I will do my stretches every day for the month of January.” This is specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, timeboxed AND will set you up for the next step in establishing a movement as medicine strategy.

A walking more SMART goal could be very simple. “I will walk for three minutes, five times a day for one week”. At the end of the week a new SMART goal can be set. Remember when setting goals to pace yourself, always pace yourself.

Kyboot

For context, I was on crutches for much of 2014. I was diagnosed at the end of 2014. You can read how I started back to moving more on How tough is it to get moving?. My major goals for 2018 are:

  • Swim a two kilometre session by 30 June 2018.
  • Increase my daily step count to 10,000 steps a day by 30 September 2018.
  • Increase my leg press to 160 kilograms by 30 June 2018. (I was at 140 kg before my treatment change – I have to work back up after dropping back).

As I achieve those, I will set new goals during the year.

Of course, I have one other goal: help others get moving! I am back to normal availability after my recent hiatus, so reach out. It costs nothing to investigate the possibility.

Have a great time over the break! Stay safe!

Coping With Christmas!

Christmas is a time of family get-togethers, great food, fun, laughter, presents and perhaps a glass or two, or three of wine or other festive cheer of your choice. Often there are lunches with one family, then travel to dinner with another. There may be picnics and BBQs on days either side. Excited children waking early to open presents.

During the month of December there is shopping to be done, decorations to be hung, the tree has to look perfect.

SLOW DOWN!!!!

Chronic conditions don’t take a holiday over Christmas and New Year – they have this remarkable ability to keep on keeping on.

Here are my tips for keeping on track during the holidays. Click on the links provided for more information!

Avoid the Boom Bust Cycle

This is the very time of the year you want to ensure you avoid the boom bust cycle.

This is the very time of the year I hope your friends and family understand the activity limits you set for self-preservation.

Don’t try to do EVERYTHING, don’t try to be perfect or to meet social expectations. You know your limits, adhere to them.

It goes without saying not to leave things to the last minute – plan out the month of December carefully so you don’t overdo on some days.

Watch the Calories!

Ensure you pay attention to your calorie intake. The festive season is one where we can easily indulge and spend the next month paying for the privilege by increased pain levels in our joints.

Keep Moving!

While it might be difficult to keep up all your exercise routines every day, please ensure you maintain your daily stretching.

Sun Protection is a MUST!

Remember to slip, slop, slap! It can be easy to forget your sun protection when partying. Don’t!

Have Fun

There is no link for this tip – just have fun, enjoy your friends and family.

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, Happy Festive Season.

If you aren’t exercising yet, you are still working up the courage, make a New Year’s resolution to call or email me in January.