My Personal Weight Management Under #StayAtHome

Yesterday I tweeted:

I did not expect the reaction! I promised to write in more detail what I am doing to achieve this, so here it is. I want to stress this is what works for me, given my current circumstances. It is really intended for people of similar age and in similarly physically challenging circumstances. While the #StayAtHome situation is common to most of us, of course the knee issue is an added complication. Unlike my recent short videos, this will be a long read, so buckle in folks!

Situation Summary

I have been in self-isolation since March 1. The gyms closed, the pools closed. I am a weight training person: suddenly I couldn’t even do upper body or hydrotherapy. The knee is preventing any lower body weights work or walking. I am also nearly 65. We all know as we get older it becomes harder to manage our weight than when we were 25.

I was terrified of gaining weight and making my knee pain worse. Due to several changes of medications and predisolone off and on over the period in question, I had gained a few kilos during late 2018/early 2019. I have been very successful in reversing that trend, especially once my clinical drug trial got underway, with the suggestion and support of my endocrinologist to adopt the philosophies of Dr Michael Mosley. I’d never known it was considered safe to eat 800 calories a day. I do now! Before you stop reading in horror, I’m not eating 800 calories a day now! But it is a damn good kick start to get you going and I do still apply the macro principles espoused by Dr Mosley.

Comfort Eating

Several responses to the above tweet raised the issue of comfort eating. This is an issue that is exacerbated by isolation, anxiety (e.g. about the current health crisis of Covid19) and boredom among other drivers. A chronic illness patient I know once said to me she stopped comfort eating when she realised she was “eating her pain” – and she didn’t just mean physical pain, she meant emotional pain as well. Once she had that epiphany she was able to stop. She looked for and found other ways to deal with her pain.

I find boredom can be an issue for me, especially when I can’t go to the gym or swim and I am locked away. For me, the recording (discussed below) helps immensely. I can see what I’m eating instantly.

I have no great solution for comfort eating, I am sorry, as it is a bit out of my field of expertise. I would suggest perhaps consulting a psychologist if it is impacting your weight management efforts. Mental health is a critical factor and if you have a chronic illness, in Australia you are entitled to a Mental Health Care Plan. Use it.

Understand Your BMR

Before we even look at food, my recommendation to anyone on a weight management journey is to understand your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR). This is the number of calories your body burns being alive. Nothing else, just being alive. Our BMR drops as we age. This calculator at MyDr.com.au is the one I use: http://tools.mydr.com.au/tools/basal-energy-calculator

Pop in your details at various ages and you will see the BMR drop. Of course this is a average. If, like me, you are an avid weights person you will have more lean muscle mass and your BMR will be higher. Conversely, you may be on medications that actually reduce your BMR as a side effect. Even so, as a place to start, it is a good indication.

If you do no exercise and you eat more than your BMR, you will gain weight. There is more to it than that if we want to delve into the science, but for our purposes, it is that simple, really. Note well: exercise in this context includes NEAT!

Be very aware though, your current weight may drive your BMR reading up. If your BMR says 2,000 calories a day, you don’t want to be eating that if weight loss is your goal. Try putting your target weight into the calculator – work from that.

Net Calories

If I am exercising in my normal manner, I live by net calories. My calorie target for the day plus what I “earn” exercising less what I eat. When I cannot exercise “properly” as is the current case, I aim for less than my BMR. At the moment I aim for 1,200 calories a day or less, with the odd 800 calorie day thrown in for good measure.

When I fill up my car the fuel tank capacity limits how much I can put in. Unless the car burns the fuel, no more will fit. Humans are not limited in the same way – if we don’t burn it, we just expand to make room (store the fuel).

Record, Record, Record

I cannot stress strongly enough to record your food intake. If you are anything like me, you forget that snack you had at 10 am. Or you don’t realise that SMALL muffin you grabbed en route home from the pharmacy was actually 530 calories! I use My Fitness Pal, there is Cronometer and various other apps out there. Find one that you like.

Recording means measuring. Get food scales. Measure.

Dietary Protein

My next tip is to look at your dietary protein. Are you eating enough protein? From talking to people I suggest many, especially older people living alone, are not eating enough protein. Without enough protein we can feel hungry and snack (usually on carb heavy stuff) unnecessarily.

My interest in dietary protein came about from my own experience. I noticed my protein levels had dropped when I reviewed my My Fitness Pal recording at one stage back in 2017. I was also in more pain from my psoriatic arthritis, although I wasn’t thinking of a causal link. I upped my protein for general health reasons and suddenly my pain levels dropped. Hmmmm, I thought. At the physiotherapist, I picked his brains, “Are you aware of any research around dietary protein and pain levels?”. No, he wasn’t aware of any so I came home and researched. This is one of the articles I found, which I rather like as it is succinct in stating the findings.

Effects of inflammation and/or inactivity on the need for dietary protein

Remember too that a 100 gram steak is NOT 100 grams of protein. It is about (depending on cut, quality, etc) 23 grams of protein. Know your protein sources.

Serving Sizes

All food packets have a recommended serving size. These are guidelines, not mandatory rules. Most bread packets have a serving size of two slices. I do not need two slices of bread under my omelette (see main photo above), I won’t burn that extra fuel.

My favourite high fibre muesli has a serving size of 45 grams. I have 35 grams with 160 grams of high protein yoghurt. I don’t miss the 10 grams, but over a week it adds up to less calories.

Adjust serving sizes to suit your circumstances. When I’m able to lift weights again, I’ll go back to 45 grams of muesli!

Ease of Preparation

Some people love cooking, others do not. Other people have physical challenges around standing chopping up vegetables, for example. Some of us have days where our medical conditions flare. Living alone can result in wastage as fresh vegetables go off before we use them. How I deal with this is frozen vegetables. No, I don’t find them particularly wonderfully cordon bleu – but they serve a purpose. Prepped, pre-measured, 2.5 minutes in the microwave. Here is one instance where I double the serve – as each bag contains two standard serves.

Another variety with chicken.

I’ve found this frozen spinach great for omelettes!

Two blocks of this (about 50 grams) with two eggs. I microwave it per the first half of the instructions, drain and pop in my non-stick pan for a minute or so, pour beaten eggs over. Cook. Greens and protein in one simple meal.

I stick to fresh salad vegetables such as lettuce, cucumber, mushrooms and tomato. They are easier to buy in “as needed” quantities. Of course, as I am in isolation and receiving grocery deliveries, that is more difficult. Another benefit to frozen vegetables at the moment as I’m not dependent on deliveries to have vegetables.

Meal Replacement

Eating the increased amount of protein as discussed above and keeping calories down can be a challenge. I was also told by a friend (I have NOT substantiated this) that in some cultures older people eat very little late in the day, but it makes sense, especially when there are reduced levels of activity.

I have been replacing most evening meals with a protein shake. This brand was recommended to me by a work colleague who is a amateur marathon runner. I chose this product.

I’ve tried various meal replacement shakes and work out protein shakes over the years, but I really do like this one as it is virtually all protein and suits my particular needs well at this time. Once I’m back in the gym, I’ll change to one of their “work out” formulated products and probably not use it as a meal replacement but as a work out supplement.

The cost is $2.13 a serve, which is cheaper than a steak! I buy the large container because it is cheaper per kilo and is delivery free.

Carbohydrates

You will notice not one photo of potatoes or rice. I am a very low carb, healthy fats, high protein eater. I do eat fresh fruit: bananas, peaches, apricots, apples, grapefruit, plums, mandarins. While sugar is the bane of my existence, as it is in everything, fruit has other health benefits. I do limit my intake to two pieces of fruit maximum a day.

Did you know there is 11 grams of sugar in a cup of milk? Anything low fat is often high/added sugar. I tend to triple check the sugar content of anything that is labelled “low fat”. The version that isn’t low fat may actually be better for you.

I found a great low carb, high protein bread that is really nice, highly recommend!

Watch out for “hidden” carbohydrates. This label is a classic example.

Knowing the calorie value of each macro (fats X 9, carbs and protein X 4) my mental arithmetic could not see where the 337 calories was coming from. See the red arrow? Yes, glycerol. 4.32 calories per gram. A whopping 14.3 grams! In the USA it is required it be included in the total carbohydrates. Not in Australia, it seems. Read labels, be aware of possible hidden stuff you don’t want.

Emergencies

Have healthy food you can prepare with no effort if necessary. This prevents grabbing something carb/sugar heavy. I keep four of these in the freezer for flare days. I like these ones, but everyone’s tastes are different. Find ones you like that you can have on hand for emergencies. These two are usually on special for $4.00 each, other varieties may be dearer.

I also have tinned salmon which requires no preparation or cooking. Never run out of eggs!

Treats

Yes, treats. Gotta have treats! At nearly 65 and not aiming to appear on the cover of Vogue anytime soon, I’m not going to be a martyr.

At the moment I am alternating between two treats I allow myself, ONE treat a day.

20 grams of this:

or 67 grams of this:

The 20 grams of chocolate is basically 50% sugar – not really a good choice, I’m eating 2 teaspoons of sugar. But we have to cut ourselves a little slack!

The ice cream (comes in chocolate too) is a much healthier choice as you can see from the label. This is a serving (on a bread and butter plate).

If I am out going to the doctor or the pharmacy I may well indulge in a skinny flat white and a sweet treat – but that would be once a week at the most. More likely once a month under our current #StayAtHome rules and doctors doing telehealth!

One-liners

  • Drink plenty of water – helps you feel full
  • Watch how many coffees you have – can be 50 calories an instant coffee (4 grams raw sugar)
  • Get enough sleep (lack of sleep affects cortisol levels)
  • Eat breakfast
  • Eat slowly (mindful eating is a thing)
  • Eat ice cream with a teaspoon
  • Use smaller plates, the meals I have pictured here are on my entree plates
  • No or at least very minimal alcohol – empty calories
  • No soft drinks (unless used as a small treat)

In Conclusion

I’m reiterating: this current regime of mine is for a particular set of circumstances: minimal activity, isolation, age, pending replacement knee surgery (so very important I not gain weight), pain management requires weight management.

This is certainly not how I eat when I am weight training three or four times a week and swimming two or three times a week. It would not be how I would eat if I was 25.

Some of my weight loss this last month will have been muscle, which concerns me, but there is little I can do about that at the moment.

ALWAYS check with your health care professional for your specific circumstances!

Please ask questions in the comments, as anything you are wondering about may be a question other readers have as well.

 

Published by

Robyn Dunphy

I offer exercise guidance to those with chronic medical conditions where exercise is beneficial.

2 thoughts on “My Personal Weight Management Under #StayAtHome

  1. Thank you very much for this detailed plan. It has given me inspiration. Appreciate you taking the time. Good luck .

    Like

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