Make 2018 YOUR Year for SMART Goals

Seasons Greetings to all! Christmas is 30 or so hours away as I write (for those of us in the southern hemisphere). As the sun sets on 2017, we have an opportunity to re-evaluate our health progress and polish up our plans to get stronger, more active, more mobile and have less pain, less lethargy, better sleep: culminating in a better quality of life in 2018.

If you are still in “I’m thinking about it” mode, take stock over Christmas. What invitations did you turn down because you didn’t feel you could summon the energy required? Would you like to accept those invitations next year? Were you able to do the shopping you wanted to do without crashing in a heap for two days afterwards? Make 2018 the year you make the choice to include moving more into your treatment plans.

Talk to your doctors, get a clear understanding of what benefits you may expect from moving more.

SMART Goals

Now that my recent treatment change is behind me, I’m making more ambitious plans for myself and setting new goals for the new year. SMART goals. SMART goals are used in many walks of life: I’ve seen various wordings used depending on the context. For our purposes, I like the following definitions.

S = Specific. The goal needs to be something specific, not a nebulous idea.

M = Measurable. If we can’t measure our achievements against the goal, we won’t know if we are getting anywhere.

A = Achievable. It has to be achievable. If I set myself a goal of climbing Mt Everest, while both specific and measurable, for me it is not achievable. Swimming a two kilometre session – THAT is achievable.

R = Relevant. You will see realistic often used in this spot, but for our purposes I prefer relevant. We have limitations on our energy, our strength and our time. There is no point in setting goals that are not relevant to what we wish to achieve, which is better quality of life.

T = Timeboxed. There needs to be a time period within which you will achieve this goal. This helps to hold you to account and stay on target.

Let’s give it a try. “My goal is to swim two kilometres.” Is this a SMART goal?

No, it isn’t. While it is specific, measurable, relevant and (I hope) achievable, I have set no time target. “I want to walk more”, while relevant and achievable, is not a measurable goal – “more” could be anything. Walk longer distances or walk more often? Nor is it timeboxed. Walk more by when? 

Let’s have another go at this. “My goal is to swim a two kilometre session by 30 June 2018”. Now I have a SMART goal. I will need a progress plan to reach that goal, so I will need shorter term goals to get there: “My goal is to swim 1.2 kilometres once a week by 28 February 2018”.

That is one of my goals. Yours may well be something along the lines of “I will do my stretches every day for the month of January.” This is specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, timeboxed AND will set you up for the next step in establishing a movement as medicine strategy.

A walking more SMART goal could be very simple. “I will walk for three minutes, five times a day for one week”. At the end of the week a new SMART goal can be set. Remember when setting goals to pace yourself, always pace yourself.

Kyboot

For context, I was on crutches for much of 2014. I was diagnosed at the end of 2014. You can read how I started back to moving more on How tough is it to get moving?. My major goals for 2018 are:

  • Swim a two kilometre session by 30 June 2018.
  • Increase my daily step count to 10,000 steps a day by 30 September 2018.
  • Increase my leg press to 160 kilograms by 30 June 2018. (I was at 140 kg before my treatment change – I have to work back up after dropping back).

As I achieve those, I will set new goals during the year.

Of course, I have one other goal: help others get moving! I am back to normal availability after my recent hiatus, so reach out. It costs nothing to investigate the possibility.

Have a great time over the break! Stay safe!

You CAN do it!

These last few weeks have reminded me of my early days. A quick summary of the process: I stopped my hyperthyroid medication on November 5 in preparation for the radioactive iodine treatment, the radioactive dose was administered on November 17, I restarted my medication on November 27 at half the previous dose. The radioactive iodine doesn’t work for about three months, maybe even six months.

I am starting to feel much better now, one month and one day after after having the radioactive iodine. Today I managed a 50 minute strength workout but I am still 60 kilograms down on my leg press from where I was. I could not complete the final set of hammer curls. The lats and hamstrings seem to have held up reasonably well.

The nausea attacks have been quite frequent and the heat intolerance has been through the roof. Sleep disruption has again been an issue, resulting in more than the usual level of brain fog and certainly increased fatigue.

Overall, similar to when I was diagnosed back in 2014. Even the emotions resurfaced. As I struggled to finish that final set of hammer curls today I felt the tears building. Using the mindfulness techniques we learnt at the Pain Management Program I sat and reminded myself this is NOT a permanent situation. With the principles of pacing in mind, I did not push myself given the circumstances. I let the frustration go.

Normally I walk about a kilometre after my strength session to cool down, but today it was 33 Celsius and I am heat intolerant! So the walking went by the board too. I thought to myself how easy it can be to just give up. The feelings of being physically restricted are not something I like. I was glad it was not a busy time in the gym today – no-one to witness my meagre efforts. Meagre? No, the truth is my workout wasn’t meagre given the circumstances. There are many patients who can’t yet achieve what I have achieved with my medical conditions. There is that mental battle to accept the limitations AND feel satisfaction, a little pride even, for achieving sufficient physicality to regain quality of life.

Today reminded me of those old emotional battles. You CAN do it! If I, a “senior” can do it (yes, I’m playing the “old” card to motivate YOU), you can too!

The difference is I am not newly diagnosed. I know from my own practical experience that exercise is so very beneficial. Those who are newly diagnosed or who have never tried movement as medicine do not have that experience to motivate them.

I know I will get back to the levels I was at prior to this little bump in the road. I will then continue to improve as I was before. I understand what is happening in my body at this time. Not completely understand because we do not yet have an explanation for my iron levels, but we are dealing with one thing at a time. The colorectal investigations were all clear (thankfully) so that isn’t the reason. Once the thyroid function is normal, we’ll revisit the iron question having already eliminated the worst case scenario.

I also know not to go at this like a bull at a gate (something my father always accused me of doing). I’ll keep working out, I’ll keep swimming, stretching and working on VMO activation! I will just listen to my body at this time, noting what small improvements I achieve over the next two months.

All of this has delayed me opening bookings again, for which I apologise. It is also a learning experience which will be of benefit to my clients.

Limber Up to Live Life!  Check with your doctors whether exercise will help you regain quality of life. Then call me. More than happy to have no-obligation discussions if you are interested in investigating adding exercise to your treatment plan.

driving

When Treatment Throws Rocks on the Road

Maintaining our upward trajectory in managing our conditions can run into obstacles every now and then, one of those rocks in the road can be a change of treatment. We need to ensure we don’t let our progress to date slide away while at the same time ensuring we give ourselves physical and emotional space to deal with the bumps in the road.

What I have learnt from my own recent experience of changing treatment, is this.

Triple Check Any Timing Advice

You may get different advice from different practitioners involved in the treatment, if there is more than one practitioner (as is so often the case). If you have to make plans, such as time off work or someone else to care for your children, triple check! My example is I was originally told I would need to be isolated for ten days. I made plans around that advice, such as leave from work. A week before the treatment, I discovered it was five days for work, fourteen days for family/friends over five years of age who were not pregnant, and twenty-eight days for under-fives and pregnant women (which of course can affect working arrangements depending on your job). My isolation specifications are all around time and proximity: preferably not closer than two metres for more than 15 minutes a day.

The point is, when we plan for child care or time off work well in advance, we need to be confident we are planning correctly. I haven’t got to the root cause of why the patient gets different advice from different parties, just warning it is possible, so watch out for it!

Ask About Your Specific Activities

While there were pages of frequently asked questions provided, not one of them addressed swimming or going to the gym! In my case I was allowed to swim on Day 3 and go to the gym on Day 5, provided I took my own towel and kept two metres away from children. I needed to specifically ask about exercise related activities though – something I think is an improvement that could be made in the documentation!

The medical profession are certainly quick to tell us exercise is important medicine (obviously I agree) but then leave all mention of exercise activities out of the FAQs.

Make Sure You Are Advised Of Any Possible Health Effects

Perhaps due to my own naivety I expected my change of treatment to be relatively smooth. In reality, it really has been smooth, I certainly can’t complain too much! Let’s say the effects can be disruptive to your normal routines. I had a period of feeling, as an English friend says, “rough”. Rather a good description, really, rough!  While every situation is different because there are a myriad treatments out there for a myriad of conditions, I found I had an increase in nausea/lightheadedness attacks (which are quite debilitating) and I started to feel RA pain in my hands – this I believe due to the fact my thyroid was having a field day running wild while waiting for the radioactive iodine to work its magic. A thyroid on a binge can exacerbate RA symptoms. Lethargy/fatigue reared its ugly head as well for a few days.

This is being resolved by my going back on my old thyroid medication at a half dose – not an unusual recommendation in my situation, but every case is different. This is an EXAMPLE only!

A stroke survivor friend of mine recently ended up in hospital as his body adjusts to a change in medication. Very different medical cases, he and I, but similar results in that a change of treatment lead to a changed health experience, albeit temporary.

Make sure you are aware of what you might expect and the steps to take to mitigate any unpleasant effects. I knew I could call my endocrinologist for directions, I knew what to watch out for and my GP is watching over me.

Keep Moving As Much As You Can

I will be the first to admit when the nausea/lightheadedness kicks in, there is not much moving of any sort to be done. I am still constantly surprised at how debilitating it is: there is NOTHING I can do when it hits. Apart from take anti-nausea medication. Other patients I have spoken to say similar. No pain, just the awful, all-consuming feeling of utter “OMG, I have to lay down”.

In my case, the overactive thyroid, probably in conjunction with the low iron (lots of chicken and egg stuff here, I have to say) definitely affected my muscle strength/tone. I was very keen to get back in the gym as soon as possible as I know my conditions result in the loss of previous strength gains very quickly.  I’ve worked very hard to be able to do what I do now, I don’t want a ” one step forward, five steps back” situation! I actually haven’t made it to the gym since the treatment change. I was heading to the gym yesterday, but I got waylaid buying a dress – not the advice I would give my clients, but I’m excusing myself on the basis I did walk 8,295 steps in the process of said retail therapy! So back into it today!

I have been swimming, although that was before I started back on the medications and I could only manage 500 or 600 metres before I felt completely wiped out. The point is – do as much as you can, while at the same time being cognisant of the fact your body is going through an internal adjustment. Making the judgement of how much is not enough or too much is a skill that needs to be developed – if this is a first time experience for you, you may need some professional help in making the right choices. Listening to your body and common sense are pretty good decision making aids. Just don’t fall into the trap of using any side-effects of the treatment change as an escape clause, because you will likely regret it later.

I did definitely find I was getting stiffer over the worst few days – reminded me very clearly of WHY I started all this exercise stuff in the first place! I don’t like that stiffness one little bit. Very glad to be getting back to my definition of normal now!

Summary

A change of treatment is often recommended for a variety of reasons. I had a change of RA medication in 2016 with no rocks on the road. This time has been a bit different. I am sure over the coming years I may have other treatment adjustments or changes.

Each change may or may not bring temporary changes to our experience. Our goal during these times is to minimise any reversal of our quality of life gains to date.

As mentioned above I felt stiffness starting to return over a few days of relative inactivity. I was stiff getting out of bed, stiff getting off chairs and was finding getting out of my car a bit of a challenge. THAT, if nothing else, is enough of a trigger for me to GET MOVING! The last thing I want is to be unable to get in and out of my car!

Be prepared, plan well, use the medical support available and most of all KEEP MOVING!

Good luck!

leg press

Change Your Exercises for Safety

The target audience for this article is those who are already gym literate. You know how to do a dumbbell bench press and load the leg press. Your technique has always been good and you’ve never hurt yourself in the gym. You are trying to pick up where you left off, but now you have the complication of our new partner, our chronic illness, or some degenerative change making things a little different.

Here are some personal practical examples to illustrate you can change what you are used to doing and still achieve your goals. No, not your old goals – your NEW goals! The ones you have now for regaining or retaining your quality of life!

Dumbbell Bench Press

As previously mentioned, I have a few problems in my lumbar spine: a bulging disc, a herniated disc and some very grumpy facet joints. I have always preferred free weights. I knew something I was doing in the gym was irritating my back, but I wasn’t 100% sure which exercise. I suspected it was the dumbbell bench press – not the actual exercise, but getting off the bench at the end of a set. Every time I finished a set, I felt a definite sharp twinge (that may be an understatement there) in my lumbar spine and I would suffer varying degrees of discomfort in the following days.

I stared at the chest press machine and decided I was going to have to give that a try.

The action of getting off the machine is not subjecting my back to any undue stress.

It works. No aggravation of my back as I step out of the seat. No, I’m not happy about giving up my free weights, but I’d rather adapt my exercises than not do them at all.

Much easier than getting off the bench!

In February I will under go Radiofrequency Facet Joint Denervation which will hopefully help: in the meantime I have adapted. If the RFJD works, then I’ll have time to work on building the muscles supporting the spine in readiness for when the RFJD wears off.

Edit March 2018: I avoided the above-mentioned denervation! Exercise rules!!

Loading the Leg Press

Those weights for the leg press have two handles – use them! I realised lifting and carrying a 20 kilogram weight one-handed was not something I should do any more. By the time I’d loaded six of these onto the machine, plus the top-up weights, I was feeling it. Then there is putting the weights away at the end. You DO put the weights away, don’t you? Yes, I knew you did! Using two hands feels a bit awkward at first, but better to use two hands than stop doing the leg press altogether. 

Some readers may have no difficulty with a mere 20 kilograms, I realise that. Some of us more mature souls, or those starting back slowly may be very wise to take things gently initially! Pace up!

Leg Curl

Prone (face down) leg curl is another exercise my back doesn’t like. Luckily my gym has a seated leg curl machine. I’ve found I can do my leg curls with no issues at all in a seated position. No, it doesn’t look as tough, but I no longer care about looking tough, I care about staying limber and strong-ish.

Leg Curl

General Tips

Remember to PACE! While you might be an old hand in the gym, are you new to the concept of pacing for medical reasons?

Make sure you adjust the seat heights (or anything else that needs adjusting) for your particular height. While we may all have been a little cavalier about such details in the past, it pays to be picky about such details now. I usually find tall people have been on everything just before me and I have to adjust every single thing! Your body will thank you.

I don’t recommend lifting to failure, unless you are well and truly on a path to remission or lucky enough to be in remission. I do, now (“now” being until my iron vanished into thin air), lift to failure, but it is something I’ve built back up to and I certainly don’t make a habit of it – besides “failure” is a lot less now than it used to be! Russian Volume Training is probably not a great idea for us either. We’ll end up in the Boom/Bust cycle again, if not with pain, with fatigue.

Slow and steady should be our mantra for the moment. All is not lost though: I know a young man who was diagnosed with reactive arthritis. Told he would not play professional sport again, he became a hypertrophy competitor, fitness professional and was one of our teachers. He is a pretty buff guy.

I hope this may give you some ideas. If you would like assistance, contact me.

Be careful and safe!

I’m done for the day!